How to Choose a Therapist

Many people choose a therapist because of a personal recommendation. Or they may choose to go to a wellbeing centre or clinic knowing that the therapists have to be qualified, accredited and insured.

When choosing a therapist, it is worth reading reviews, blogs, or the details on their website but here are some things to look out for. Has your therapist trained with a professional training body that is in itself accredited? What sort of training have they had and are they skilled and experienced? Is the accreditation body asking it’s members to meet the highest standards of ethics?

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Trained, Accredited and Insured

Most training courses for complementary therapists involve hundreds of hours of practice, so even if they are a new therapist, they will have experience. That’s where accreditation comes in. My accrediting body is the Association for Solution Focused Hypnotherapists, a body recognised by the CNHC.

Every therapist who has been professionally trained will be accredited by a professional body that ensures they abide by a stringent code of practice. The accrediting body will check that anyone applying to be accreditation is suitably qualified, trained and insured, has committed to ongoing professional development or training, and keeps their insurance up to date. Where DBS checks – enabling therapists to work with children and vulnerable adults are needed – the accrediting body may check that this is in place too.

CNHC - The Gold Standard

The Gold Standard for accreditation is The Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council, or CNHC. Your therapist may be qualified and accredited without being a member of the CNHC, but you know for sure that any therapist that is a member of this organisation has reached a high standard of training, and is already accredited with a relevant professional body.

So what’s the difference between a normal professional accreditation and a CNHC accreditation?

The CNHC was set up by the Government to protect the public. They do this by providing an independent UK register of complementary healthcare practitioners. Their website states that, “Protection of the public is our sole purpose.”

Taking the Risk out of Choosing a Therapist

Now there will be practitioners out there that do not fall under the umbrella of CNHC – from shamans to masseurs that you personally value and trust. There may be very many gifted and skilled therapists that are not registered. But a membership of CNHC takes the risk out of any choice you may make, especially when there are no other reassuring factors to help you make a judgement, like a personal testimonial or direct experience.

Hypnotherapy in particular seems to worry people. They are concerned about losing control or being manipulated. A trained and accredited hypnotherapist cannot do that, and would not do that. Stage hypnosis uses quite different techniques. Hypnotherapy has been structured to ensure clients stay in control, and are safe at all times. If that wasn’t the case, the CNHC simply would not allow hypnotherapists to join their organisation.

The CNHC sets the standards that practitioners need to meet to get onto and stay on the register. All CNHC registrants have agreed to be bound by the highest standards of conduct and have registered voluntarily. All of them are professionally trained and fully insured to practise. If you want to read the code of conduct, please find it here: I am delighted to be registered with The Complementary Healthcare & Natural Healthcare

The CNHC also has a role of investigating complaints about alleged breaches of their Code of Conduct, Ethics and Performance. They can impose disciplinary sanctions that mirror those of the statutory healthcare regulators.

Taking Personal Responsibility for your Health and Wellbeing

There is a growing recognition and appreciation that the NHS can only do so much. Their role is not to keep us all in tip top condition. They are there to help us when we are ill, and often give useful and helpful advice to keep us well, but resources are limited. Ultimately, we are, as much as possible, responsible for our own health and wellbeing. Investing in our mental and physical health increases the probability of a long and happy life. The government recognises that there is a role for complementary health practitioners in helping us achieve optimum health, and preventing us from developing serious health issues.

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There is a growing recognition and appreciation that the NHS can only do so much. Their role is not to keep us all in tip top condition. They are there to help us when we are ill, and often give useful and helpful advice to keep us well, but resources are limited. Ultimately, we are, as much as possible, responsible for our own health and wellbeing. Investing in our mental and physical health increases the probability of a long and happy life. The government recognises that there is a role for complementary health practitioners in helping us achieve optimum health, and preventing us from developing serious health issues.

Complementary Health Practitioners are particularly helpful in keeping us mentally healthy. Our minds are complex and vulnerable and any therapy that releases tension, reduces anxiety or soothes are troubles is going to help us stay mentally well.

The CNHC also represents a wide range of organisations that practice or promote complementary health care, and often makes the case to government with the aim of enhancing the UK’s health and wellbeing. They raise awareness of complementary healthcare and seek to influence policy to increase access to the disciplines that have been registered with them.

Take a look at the CNHC Website

The CNHC website is accessible by the general public, who can search for registered Practitioners, or check that practitioners are members. See https://www.cnhc.org.uk/find-practitioner. You’ll find me under Jane Pendry. However, you won’t see much detail so having satisfied yourself that a Practitioner is registered, you can explore that therapist’s website, and services with confidence.

A therapist may be registered for one specialism, but have others that they practice. So I am registered for Solution Focused Hypnotherapy, having studied and gained two diplomas and completed thousand hours of practice. I am not registered for NLP (I am a qualified and accredited Practitioner) nor for Solution Focused Brief Therapy although I have trained in these to support my Hypnotherapy practice as part of my Continuous Development Practice.

So registration with CNHC is just another factor that can help you decide if a therapist is for you and it’s worth exploring their website to see just what their role is, and how they can help protect you and ensure that any therapy you undertake is safe.

https://www.cnhc.org.uk

For further details about me and my practice, see:

www.sense-ability.co.uk